You are here

Nocturnal serum melatonin levels in sulfur mustard exposed patients with sleep disorders

TitleNocturnal serum melatonin levels in sulfur mustard exposed patients with sleep disorders
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsMousavi S.S, Vahedi E., Shohrati M., Panahi Y., Parvin S.
JournalJ R Army Med Corps
Volume163
Issue6
Pagination411-415
Date PublishedDec
ISBN Number0035-8665 (Linking)
Accession Number29146723
KeywordsCase-Control Studies, Chemical Warfare Agents/*toxicity, Chronic pulmonary problems, Cross-Sectional Studies, Humans, Iran, Lung Diseases/chemically induced/complications/diagnosis, Male, Melatonin/*blood, Middle Aged, Mustard Gas/*toxicity, Nocturnal melatonin, Occupational Exposure/adverse effects, Polysomnography, Respiratory Function Tests, Sleep quality, Sleep Wake Disorders/*etiology, Sulfur Mustard
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sulfur mustard (SM) exposure causes respiratory disorders, progressive deterioration in lung function and mortality in injured victims and poor sleep quality is one of the most common problems among SM-exposed patients. Since melatonin has a critical role in regulation of sleep and awareness, this study aimed to evaluate the serum melatonin levels in SM-injured subjects. METHODS: A total of 30 SM-exposed male patients and 10 controls was evaluated. Sleep quality was evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); daytime sleepiness was measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the risk of obstructive sleep apnoea was determined by the STOP-Bang questionnaire. Polysomnography (PSG) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were also available. Nocturnal serum melatonin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. RESULTS: The mean of PSQI, ESS and STOP-Bang scores in patients (11.76+/-3.56, 12.6+/-3.03 and 5.03+/-1.09, respectively) were significantly (p<0.01) higher than those in the controls (2.78+/-0.83, 4.69+/-1.15 and 1.18+/-0.82, respectively). PFTs also showed declined respiratory quality in SM-patients. There was a significant difference regarding the PSG results between patients and controls (p<0.01). The mean of nocturnal serum melatonin levels in patients (29.78+/-19.31 pg/mL) was significantly (p=0.005) lower than that in the controls (78.53+/-34.41 pg/mL). CONCLUSIONS: Reduced nocturnal serum melatonin and respiratory disorders can be the reasons for poor sleep quality among these patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: IRCT2015092924267N1, Pre-results.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29146723
DOI10.1136/jramc-2016-000677
Short TitleNocturnal serum melatonin levels in sulfur mustard exposed patients with sleep disorders

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer