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Recent Publications of Rutgers University CounterACT Research Center of Excellence Members

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Laskin JD OR Laskin DL OR Marion MK OR Gerecke DR OR Heindel ND OR Heck DE OR Sinko PJ
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Anti-TNFα Therapy in Inflammatory Lung Diseases bn.

Sat, 06/24/2017 - 10:26
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Anti-TNFα Therapy in Inflammatory Lung Diseases bn.

Pharmacol Ther. 2017 Jun 19;:

Authors: Malaviya R, Laskin JD, Laskin DL

Abstract
Increased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α have been linked to a number of pulmonary inflammatory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), sarcoidosis, and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). TNFα plays multiple roles in disease pathology by inducing an accumulation of inflammatory cells, stimulating the generation of inflammatory mediators, and causing oxidative and nitrosative stress, airway hyperresponsiveness and tissue remodeling. TNF-targeting biologics, therefore, present a potentially highly efficacious treatment option. This review summarizes current knowledge on the role of TNFα in pulmonary disease pathologies, with a focus on the therapeutic potential of TNFα-targeting agents in treating inflammatory lung diseases.

PMID: 28642115 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Localization of the placental BCRP/ABCG2 transporter to lipid rafts: Role for cholesterol in mediating efflux activity.

Mon, 06/19/2017 - 10:33

Localization of the placental BCRP/ABCG2 transporter to lipid rafts: Role for cholesterol in mediating efflux activity.

Placenta. 2017 Jul;55:29-36

Authors: Szilagyi JT, Vetrano AM, Laskin JD, Aleksunes LM

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an efflux transporter in the placental barrier. By transporting chemicals from the fetal to the maternal circulation, BCRP limits fetal exposure to a range of drugs, toxicants, and endobiotics such as bile acids and hormones. The purpose of the present studies was to 1) determine whether BCRP localizes to highly-ordered, cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains in placenta microvillous membranes, and 2) determine the impact of cholesterol on BCRP-mediated placental transport in vitro.
METHODS: BCRP expression was analyzed in lipid rafts isolated from placentas from healthy, term pregnancies and BeWo trophoblasts by density gradient ultracentrifugation. BeWo cells were also tested for their ability to efflux BCRP substrates after treatment with the cholesterol sequestrant methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 h) or the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor pravastatin (200 μM, 48 h).
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: BCRP was found to co-localize with lipid raft proteins in detergent-resistant, lipid raft-containing fractions from placental microvillous membranes and BeWo cells. Treatment of BeWo cells with MβCD redistributed BCRP protein into higher density non-lipid raft fractions. Repletion of the cells with cholesterol restored BCRP localization to lipid raft-containing fractions. Treatment of BeWo cells with MβCD or pravastatin increased cellular retention of two BCRP substrates, the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 and the mycotoxin zearalenone. Repletion with cholesterol restored BCRP transporter activity. Taken together, these data demonstrate that cholesterol may play a critical role in the post-translational regulation of BCRP in placental lipid rafts.

PMID: 28623970 [PubMed - in process]

Mitigation of nitrogen mustard mediated skin injury by a novel indomethacin bifunctional prodrug.

Wed, 06/14/2017 - 10:12
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Mitigation of nitrogen mustard mediated skin injury by a novel indomethacin bifunctional prodrug.

Exp Mol Pathol. 2016 Jun;100(3):522-31

Authors: Composto GM, Laskin JD, Laskin DL, Gerecke DR, Casillas RP, Heindel ND, Joseph LB, Heck DE

Abstract
Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that is highly reactive in the skin causing extensive tissue damage and blistering. In the present studies, a modified cutaneous murine patch model was developed to characterize NM-induced injury and to evaluate the efficacy of an indomethacin pro-drug in mitigating toxicity. NM (20μmol) or vehicle control was applied onto 6mm glass microfiber filters affixed to the shaved dorsal skin of CD-1 mice for 6min. This resulted in absorption of approximately 4μmol of NM. NM caused localized skin damage within 1 d, progressing to an eschar within 2-3 d, followed by wound healing after 4-5 d. NM-induced injury was associated with increases in skin thickness, inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced numbers of sebocytes, basal keratinocyte double stranded DNA breaks, as measured by phospho-histone 2A.X expression, mast cell degranulation and increases in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Wound healing was characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and marked increases in basal cells expressing proliferating cell nuclear antigen. A novel indomethacin-anticholinergic prodrug (4338) designed to target cyclooxygenases and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), was found to markedly suppress NM toxicity, decreasing wound thickness and eschar formation. The prodrug also inhibited mast cell degranulation, suppressed keratinocyte expression of iNOS and COX-2, as well as markers of epidermal proliferation. These findings indicate that a novel bifunctional pro-drug is effective in limiting NM mediated dermal injury. Moreover, our newly developed cutaneous patch model is a sensitive and reproducible method to assess the mechanism of action of countermeasures.

PMID: 27189522 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Diacetyl/L-xylulose reductase mediates chemical redox cycling in lung epithelial cells.

Fri, 06/09/2017 - 10:45

Diacetyl/L-xylulose reductase mediates chemical redox cycling in lung epithelial cells.

Chem Res Toxicol. 2017 Jun 08;:

Authors: Yang S, Jan YH, Mishin V, Heck DE, Laskin DL, Laskin JD

Abstract
Reactive carbonyls such as diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) and 2,3-pentanedione in tobacco and many food and consumer products are known to cause severe respiratory diseases. Many of these chemicals are detoxified by carbonyl reductases in the lung, in particular, dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase (DCXR), a multifunctional enzyme important in glucose metabolism. DCXR is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Using recombinant human enzyme, we discovered that DCXR mediates redox cycling of a variety of quinones generating superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and, in the presence of transition metals, hydroxyl radicals. Redox cycling activity preferentially utilized NADH as a co-substrate and was greatest for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and 1,2-naphthoquinone, followed by 1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione). Using 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as the substrate, quinone redox cycling was found to inhibit DCXR reduction of L-xylulose and diacetyl. Competitive inhibition of enzyme activity by the quinone was observed with respect to diacetyl (Ki = 190 µM) and L-xylulose (Ki = 940 µM). Abundant DCXR activity was identified in A549 lung epithelial cells when diacetyl was used as a substrate. Quinones inhibited reduction of this dicarbonyl, causing an accumulation of diacetyl in the cells and culture medium and a decrease in acetoin, the reduced product of diacetyl. The identification of DCXR as an enzyme activity mediating chemical redox cycling suggests that it may be important in generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the lung. These activities, together with inhibition dicarbonyl/L-xylulose metabolism by redox-active chemicals, as well as consequent deficiencies in pentose metabolism, are likely to contribute to lung injury following exposure to dicarbonyls and quinones.

PMID: 28595002 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung.

Fri, 06/02/2017 - 10:32
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World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung.

Exp Mol Pathol. 2017 Feb;102(1):50-58

Authors: Sunil VR, Vayas KN, Fang M, Zarbl H, Massa C, Gow AJ, Cervelli JA, Kipen H, Laumbach RJ, Lioy PJ, Laskin JD, Laskin DL

Abstract
Exposure to World Trade Center (WTC) dust has been linked to respiratory disease in humans. In the present studies we developed a rodent model of WTC dust exposure to analyze lung oxidative stress and inflammation, with the goal of elucidating potential epigenetic mechanisms underlying these responses. Exposure of mice to WTC dust (20μg, i.t.) was associated with upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 within 3days, a response which persisted for at least 21days. Whereas matrix metalloproteinase was upregulated 7days post-WTC dust exposure, IL-6RA1 was increased at 21days; conversely, expression of mannose receptor, a scavenger receptor important in particle clearance, decreased. After WTC dust exposure, increases in methylation of histone H3 lysine K4 at 3days, lysine K27 at 7days and lysine K36, were observed in the lung, along with hypermethylation of Line-1 element at 21days. Alterations in pulmonary mechanics were also observed following WTC dust exposure. Thus, 3days post-exposure, lung resistance and tissue damping were decreased. In contrast at 21days, lung resistance, central airway resistance, tissue damping and tissue elastance were increased. These data demonstrate that WTC dust-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with epigenetic modifications in the lung and altered pulmonary mechanics. These changes may contribute to the development of WTC dust pathologies.

PMID: 27986442 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The spleen as an extramedullary source of inflammatory cells responding to acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

Wed, 05/31/2017 - 10:32
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The spleen as an extramedullary source of inflammatory cells responding to acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2016 Aug 01;304:110-20

Authors: Mandal M, Gardner CR, Sun R, Choi H, Lad S, Mishin V, Laskin JD, Laskin DL

Abstract
Macrophages have been shown to play a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. In these studies, we analyzed the role of the spleen as an extramedullary source of hepatic macrophages. APAP administration (300mg/kg, i.p.) to control mice resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) infiltrating Ly6G(+) granulocytic and Ly6G(-) monocytic cells in the spleen and the liver. The majority of the Ly6G(+) cells were also positive for the monocyte/macrophage activation marker, Ly6C, suggesting a myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) phenotype. By comparison, Ly6G(-) cells consisted of 3 subpopulations expressing high, intermediate, and low levels of Ly6C. Splenectomy was associated with increases in mature (F4/80(+)) and immature (F4/80(-)) pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi) macrophages and mature anti-inflammatory (Ly6C(lo)) macrophages in the liver after APAP; increases in MDSCs were also noted in the livers of splenectomized (SPX) mice after APAP. This was associated with increases in APAP-induced expression of chemokine receptors regulating pro-inflammatory (CCR2) and anti-inflammatory (CX3CR1) macrophage trafficking. In contrast, APAP-induced increases in pro-inflammatory galectin-3(+) macrophages were blunted in livers of SPX mice relative to control mice, along with hepatic expression of TNF-α, as well as the anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, FIZZ-1 and YM-1. These data demonstrate that multiple subpopulations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cells respond to APAP-induced injury, and that these cells originate from distinct hematopoietic reservoirs.

PMID: 27163765 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

Tue, 05/30/2017 - 10:15
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Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2016 Aug 15;305:1-11

Authors: Weinberger B, Malaviya R, Sunil VR, Venosa A, Heck DE, Laskin JD, Laskin DL

Abstract
Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant.

PMID: 27212445 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Mustard vesicants alter expression of the endocannabinoid system in mouse skin.

Wed, 05/24/2017 - 10:58
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Mustard vesicants alter expression of the endocannabinoid system in mouse skin.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2016 Jul 15;303:30-44

Authors: Wohlman IM, Composto GM, Heck DE, Heindel ND, Lacey CJ, Guillon CD, Casillas RP, Croutch CR, Gerecke DR, Laskin DL, Joseph LB, Laskin JD

Abstract
Vesicants including sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) are bifunctional alkylating agents that cause skin inflammation, edema and blistering. This is associated with alterations in keratinocyte growth and differentiation. Endogenous cannabinoids, including N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), are important in regulating inflammation, keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing. Their activity is mediated by binding to cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Levels of endocannabinoids are regulated by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We found that CB1, CB2, PPARα and FAAH were all constitutively expressed in mouse epidermis and dermal appendages. Topical administration of NM or SM, at concentrations that induce tissue injury, resulted in upregulation of FAAH, CB1, CB2 and PPARα, a response that persisted throughout the wound healing process. Inhibitors of FAAH including a novel class of vanillyl alcohol carbamates were found to be highly effective in suppressing vesicant-induced inflammation in mouse skin. Taken together, these data indicate that the endocannabinoid system is important in regulating skin homeostasis and that inhibitors of FAAH may be useful as medical countermeasures against vesicants.

PMID: 27125198 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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